Hypermobility, is a connective tissue disorder showing up with multiple system involvement including excessive joint movement. It is mistaken as flexibility but it is the instability at the joint that allows the hypermobile individual to go beyond the expected range of motion or ability to move a joint.  As a result of the ligaments being too loose, a Bendy individual with hypermobility is more prone to joint injuries, chronic pain, and instability. The good news is that you can manage this excess joint play by understanding your tendencies, avoiding them and learning what to replace those moves with.

In this blog I will explore the type of exercise, those based on studying babies or Developmental Kinesiology moves, based on the research that has led to Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) as a cornerstone for addressing hypermobility. DNS offers a holistic approach to stabilize joints and improve neuromuscular control. We’ll explore samples of some of the DNS exercises that I do with my patients.

What Is Hypermobility?

Hypermobility Spectrum Disorder (HSD), Ehler’s Danlos Syndrome (EDS) are 2 of the common types of connective tissue disorders characterized by joints that move beyond the normal range of motion. I have written extensively about hypermobility in my blog: “Can Hypermobility Be Cured”, that I suggest you refer to before moving on.

How Should I Manage Joint Hypermobility?

When it comes to joint hypermobility, we know that the condition won’t go away however, flare-ups can occur. When it comes to flare ups, avoiding the triggering factors is obviously necessary and can be different for each person. I strongly recommend intake of electrolytes, good sleep hygiene and braces and devices to address the flare-up symptoms. Please make sure to read my blog:’ What is the best Hypermobility treatment‘ as a good source of educating yourself a bit more.

When it comes to joint hypermobility treatment, you should understand that the best approach is to understand what your natural wrong tendencies are, stop yourself before they happen and then know what to replace those moves or methods with. This means you have no choice but to be an active participant in your treatment; this also means your rehab. clinician, physical therapist, chiropractor and occupational therapist need to want to involve you by educating you as if you are going to take over the treatment of someone like you.

I always tell my patients that they are my apprentice, working with me as a team to work on their issue as the project at hand. That is the only way they don’t need to keep coming to me and that has to be their wish or we won’t succeed!

What Are The Best Exercises For Hypermobility?

If all of us started as infants, went through the same exact patterns of movement to go from helpless infants to running toddlers without any bands, weights, training, PT, DC or personal trainer, then it is fair to say that we are all programmed to move that way.

This is what Dynamic Neuromuscular Stabilization (DNS) is all about. It restores optimal neuromuscular function and joint stability by tapping into the body’s natural developmental processes.

DNS is the methodology I use to bring stability and functionality in and since we are all familiar with it (even though most of us are far from doing it) the progress, once understood, is very simple. When it comes to hypermobile joints, the tricky part is the relaxed ligaments, cueing and balancing. That is why it is so important to make sure you see a rehab clinician that treats patients with hypermobility.

baby doing a plank exercise

DNS emphasizes the integration of movement patterns to enhance functional stability. Incorporating exercises that mimic everyday movements, such as lunges and squats, helps individuals with hypermobility reinforce proper joint alignment and motor control. Bear in mind that not every lunge or squat is done right!!!

What Should I Know When Exercising For Hypermobility?

While exercise is beneficial for managing hypermobility, it’s essential to approach it with caution and mindfulness. Here are some key considerations:

  • Start Slow

Begin with gentle exercises and gradually progress in intensity and duration to avoid overexertion and injury.

  • Listen to Your Body

Pay attention to how your body responds to different exercises and modify as needed to prevent discomfort or strain.

  • Focus on Form

Emphasize proper alignment and technique to ensure effective muscle activation and joint stabilization. Commit to form and not sets and reps!

  • Learn from a rehab. clinician who treats hypermobility

What we do with our Bendy patients is different than our Normies. Many times the ‘regular’ methods actually end up hurting our hypermobile patients; it is nice to not be the subject whose wrong treatment was the reason the provider learns what not to do, right?

If you are wondering if, or if you are hypermobile and are seeking hypermobility therapy contact me.

Recommended Reading:

What Is The Best Hypermobility Treatment?

Who Diagnoses Hypermobility?