Hypermobility syndrome is excessive joint flexibility causing joint pain, instability, and other related symptoms and proper diagnosis is important for proper management and treatment. In this blog, I will explore who can diagnose hypermobility syndrome, the criteria used to identify hypermobility, and why an accurate diagnosis is essential for effective treatment.

Who Can Diagnose Hypermobility Syndrome?

Typically, by the time you have reached the potential for hypermobility diagnosis, you have seen a wide range of providers with most of them gaslighting you, making you wonder if it is all in your head! Hypermobility does not just impact your joints so it is common to see specialists such as rheumatologists, cardiologists, neurologists, orthopedists, primary care physicians, physical therapists, chiropractors, acupuncturists, and massage therapists.

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When seeking a diagnosis for hypermobility syndrome, individuals have several healthcare professionals to consider. While rheumatologists, orthopedic surgeons, and physiotherapists are commonly associated with diagnosing hypermobility, chiropractors also play a significant role in identifying and managing this condition. Chiropractors are trained to assess musculoskeletal issues, including joint hypermobility, and can provide valuable insights and treatment options.

Believe it or not,  joint hypermobility, is not something that is taught in schools and typically when it comes to seeking healthcare providers, those who are familiar with this condition have taken the initiative to learn about it themselves.

What Are The Criteria For Identifying Hypermobility?

One of the key criteria used to identify hypermobility is the Beighton score. This scoring system measures joint flexibility by assessing specific movements in various parts of the body. While the Beighton score is widely used, it’s not the only method for diagnosing hypermobility syndrome. When it comes to the rehab. clinicians, physical therapists, and Chiropractors who treat joint hypermobility may consider factors such as medical history, symptoms, and additional clinical examinations when making a diagnosis.

Hypermobility is a connective tissue condition and can be seen in people with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), Hypermobility Spectrum Disorder (HSD), Mast Cell Activation Syndrome (MCAS), and Marfan Syndrome. The physical therapists and chiropractors who treat patients with hypermobility are familiar with the different presentations that the population may present with and during the history intake, and from pattern recognition, can easily identify hypermobility.

In my practice, once I suspect EDS, knowing that there are subtypes of EDS that do not have an identified gene associated with them, I advise the patient to receive genetic counseling and subsequent testing. However, just because there may be no identified genes found does not mean that the patient is not hypermobile.

Is The Beighton Score The Same As Other Criteria?

While the Beighton score is commonly used to assess joint hypermobility, healthcare professionals may use alternative criteria or additional assessments based on their clinical judgment and expertise. Ultimately, the goal is to obtain a comprehensive understanding of the individual’s condition to guide appropriate treatment.

How Can You Vet For The Right Provider?

When seeking a healthcare provider for the diagnosis of hypermobility syndrome, it’s essential to vet for qualifications, experience, and expertise. Look for providers who have specific training or experience in musculoskeletal conditions, including hypermobility syndrome. There are resources such as EDS Society that are a good resource to start your search.

Why Is Diagnosis Important In Treatment?

A timely and accurate diagnosis of hypermobility syndrome is crucial for effective treatment and management. When it comes to joint hypermobility, the treatment rendered to the non-hypermobile population can cause pain and injury to the Bendy population. It is very important and I can’t emphasize enough, to seek care from the providers who understand hypermobility and this goes for the joint issues as well as non-joint complaints.
If you think you are hypermobile and want to know what your next option is, contact me.
Dr. Shakib

Recommended Reading:

What Is The Best Hypermobility Treatment?

TMJ and Hypermobility